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Clinton Says Saudi Arabian Executions Raise ‘Serious Questions’

The surge in prices Monday came after Saudi Arabia on Sunday cut diplomatic ties with Iran as crowds in Tehran protested against the kingdom’s execution of Nemer al-Nemer, a prominent Shiite cleric.

On Sunday, the United Arab Emirates, a key ally of Saudi Arabia, also summoned the Iranian ambassador and handed him an official letter of protest, state news agency said.

Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir told a news conference in Riyadh that the envoy of Shi’ite Iran had been asked to quit Saudi Arabia within 48 hours.

Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei predicted “divine vengeance” for the execution of Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr, an outspoken opponent of the Saudi Arabia’s ruling family.

“Iranian authorities have facilitated the attacks on the Saudi embassy”, he said.

Jubeir responded yesterday by saying: “Iran’s history is full of negative interference and hostility in Arab issues, and it is always accompanied by destruction”.

“In the case of Saudi Arabia – rebels fighting the Assad regime”.

Bahrain’s Foreign Ministry called the attack on the Saudi embassy “demagogic and barbarian actions” which is a “flagrant violation of global doctrines and norms”. In 2015, Saudi Arabia executed 158 people, the highest total in two decades.

The hundreds of protesters outside the embassy denouncing Nimr’s death and angrily chanted slogans urging the closure of the “Wahhabi embassy”, referring to Saudi Arabia’s embrace of the hard-line form of Sunni Islam called Wahhabism.

The UK is the largest arms supplier to Saudi Arabia and pressure is mounting on Cameron over Britain’s relationship with a country with a dismal human rights record.

The predominantly Sunni Saudi Arabia accused Nimr of inciting violence among the nation’s Shiite minority, while human rights groups, like Amnesty International, claimed the cleric was a peaceful dissident.

The West’s faltering reaction to the Saudi executions of 47 men on terrorism-related charges – including Sheikh Nimr – reflects understandable concerns about dangers of a further unravelling of a region undergoing wrenching change.

In Riyadh, the foreign ministry said that by condemning the execution, Iran was supporting terrorism.

Islamic leaders had on Sunday stepped up their condemnation of the execution of al-Nimr, urging a robust response from Riyadh’s western backers, as protests spread to Pakistan and Indian Kashmir.

Saudi Arabia is the biggest producer in the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, which last month decided against cutting output levels despite a plunge in oil prices.

Dion says Canada is particularly concerned that the country’s execution of Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr could “further inflame” sectarian tensions in the region. Al-Nimr’s execution drew protests from Shiites around the world, who backed his call for reform and wider political freedom for their sect.

Saudi Arabia Supreme Court upholds death sentence on Shia cleric.

It also followed harsh criticism by Iran’s top leader of the Saudis’ execution of Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr.

“The UK is firmly opposed to the death penalty”.

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