Connect
To Top

Nigerian leader ready to engage Boko Haram on abducted girls

Nigerians on Twitter have been divided ever since on whether President Buhari who was elected a year ago March is a tyrant.

The President said he would take responsibility for any of his ministers found wanting for corruption, stressing that he did not pick anyone being tried for corruption as a minister.

“Boko Haram can not be said to have been defeated technically or otherwise without the safe return of the abducted daughters”, it noted.

Late last month, more than 50 people were killed in a 48-hour wave of attacks in the mainly Muslim region that were blamed on the jihadists.

The statement also said that the introduction of the Treasury Single Account (TSA) to the finance sector of government agencies nationwide had injected a powerful dose of probity and accountability into public finance.

President Buhari had during the conversation with Nigerian journalists accepted that the former National Security Adviser, Sambo Dasuki and the leader of Indigenous People of Biafra, Nnamdi Kanu were being held against court orders because they could run away.

President Muhammadu Buhari has asked the judiciary to support his administration in the recovery of stolen funds by speedily concluding trials and showing that impunity no longer has a place in Nigeria.

Boko Haram has killed thousands of people and displaced more than 1.5 million during a six-year insurgency to establish Islamic law in Africa’s largest oil producer and biggest economy.

Buhari, who was sworn in as president in May, told reporters that there is “no firm intelligence on where those girls are physically located and what condition they are in”.

Boko Haram seized the girls from their dormitories in the northeastern town of Chibok in April 2014, sparking worldwide outrage.

While welcoming Nigerians to the New Year, Mr. Buhari said he would continue with the change already began by his administration.

“Banning hijab is not enough”.

Turning to the economy, Buhari said he was unconvinced of the need to devalue the naira, which has plummeted against the US dollar over the past year, and insisted it would harm Nigeria’s import-reliant economy.

More in AmeriPublications